Cornwall – the third and final part

Rain like stair-rods Thursday morning – which reminds me, we saw a set of 11 pairs of Bakelite stair carpet clips in a second-hand shop.  Never seen such a thing before.  A small square with grooves would be screwed to the stair riser, just beyond the edge of the carpet, and then the 3 inch long clip slid into grooves on the fixed piece, holding it firmly in place projecting two inches over the carpet.  A pair would hold it in place against each riser, and Robert’s your mother’s brother – job done.

These were the very things we saw - but I found this image on e-bay.

These were the very things we saw – but I found this image on e-bay.

So – where was I?  Heavy rain drove us to a covered venue, and the 572 offered a dry journey to Plymouth art gallery and museum.  We joined a group of bus-pass clutching oldies at the bus stop and headed out.

In the foyer there was a display of fabric decorated with cyanotype images – made by placing stencils on the treated fabric and exposing it to daylight before developing the image.  Exposed bits go blue, shaded bits uncoloured.  Made me think of at least using a stencil design for this years winter solstice card, but maybe explore blueprints as a method.

Found a painting by Prunella Clough – several feature in this blog, I like her later near abstract stuff based of decay and the falling apart of structures and surfaces.  This one was painted near the end of her life, in 1991 when she was 72 (she lived to be 80).

'Waiting 1991' by Prunella Clough, its about 2' square, and the non-abstract mushrooms strike me as atypical.

‘Waiting 1991′ by Prunella Clough, its about 2’ square, and the non-abstract mushrooms strike me as atypical.

Mel joined us for a slow chatty saunter around a gallery room or two and then lunch.  We arranged to meet up later and have dinner with her, Alex and their boys, but first I felt the need to explore the outdoors, the rain having stopped, and the sun came out.  So we found a sundial.

A big dial in the middle of Plymouth.  Given that the gnomon is surrounded by water I have decided to call this image 'Gnomon is an Island'.  I thank you.

A big dial in the middle of Plymouth. Given that the gnomon is surrounded by water I have decided to call this image ‘Gnomon is an Island’. I thank you.

Then we found a bar.  It was called Berkeley’s, and used to be a branch of Barclay’s Bank, and it offered Skinner’s Porthleven Ale.

Outside it had some fine 1930s relief sculpture.

A Cornish miner?  His right hand is holding his pick and shovel - and that's not some strange rhyming slang.  He's got a Davy lamp in his left hand.

A Cornish miner? His right hand is holding his pick and shovel – and that’s not some strange rhyming slang. He’s got a Davy lamp in his left hand.

This miner may be a Tributer.  And I learnt about that in Liskeard’s museum.  A tributer is a miner who is paid only for the ore he delivers to the mine owner, and I think its also the source of the name of St Austell brewery’s Tribute Ale.  In Liskeard we found a back street bar called the Red Lion where Penpont’s Shipwreck Coast was consumed before we were picked up by Alex and taken home for dinner.  Great food, lots of chat, I learnt a bit about racing small liquid fuelled cars, and more about my father and his other family.  Dropped at the B&B by 11.30.

Friday morning and we left Woodlands as their last ever customers in time for the 10am bus to Liskeard where we walked out to visit Jackie’s cousin Anne.  Anne has been mayor of the town and is still a Councillor, and very involved with the local church (another St Martins).  She features in a pleasing mural just off the main street.

Anne is the lady wearing a red jumper over on the right.

Anne is the lady wearing a red jumper over on the right.

After tea she walked us to her church where Jackie photographed the slate dial – a clear cousin of the Looe church dial, dated 1779, with the same motto as Looe’s and sponsored by the vicar and two church wardens – much like Looe’s.

Dial at St Martins Liskeard.

Dial at St Martins Liskeard.

The gnomons are very similar and both are direct south dials, but the Liskeard one is fancier.  Being a few years later it may have been away of demonstrating their sense of superiority.

The dial is not the only piece of technology making use of the southern exposure.  From the top of the tower I was shown their latest investment – 60 photo-voltaic panels.

The panels have been in place about a year and should be providing a good return on the money invested, but I hope they don't need the capital again.

The panels have been in place about a year and should be providing a good return on the money invested, but I hope they don’t need the capital again.

From the tower I spotted the Barley Sheaf – I suppose the moister climate here would favour barley over wheat – so we made our way there after saying goodbye to cousin Anne.  There were two customers in the main bar, drinking lager, but we went through to the skittle alley and became the first and second customers at the 4th Barley Sheaf October Beer Festival.  Managed halves of Tribute, Skinners Knocker and Exmoor Beast before heading off to find sandwiches and the 3.30 train to Paddington.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Environmental Concerns, my travels, Real Ale and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s