Newhaven Walk 2nd Feb2014

A Sunday morning stroll interrupted by a heavy and icy squall of wind-driven rain, but enough time after for the wind to dry us out.  Started at the swing bridge over the river Ouse where someone reminded me of the brewer, Thomas Tipper, who helped raise money for the first bridge over the river, erected in 1783, to replace the ferry.

Thomas Tipper's gravestone in Newhaven churchyard includes a depiction of his drawbridge or bascule bridge.

Thomas Tipper’s gravestone in Newhaven churchyard includes a depiction of his drawbridge or bascule bridge.

He brewed Stingo (strong beer) which was said to be a favourite of the Prince Regent and even gets mention in Dickens’s Martin Chuzzlewit, when Mrs Gamp calls for ‘Real Old Brighton Stingo’ and ‘Brighton Tipper’.  Today his brewery is long gone, and so has much of the traditional seaport function – replaced by housing and leisure sailing uses, but the French owned port of Newhaven still operates a French ferry, seen sailing into the sun here.

The departing ferry beyond the prettified riverside walk in Newhaven

The departing ferry beyond the prettified riverside walk in Newhaven

The river mouth is kept free of shingle by a big harbour arm jutting into the sea west of the river.  Inside its protective curve a big sandy beach has grown, and was a popular recreational facility with locals for many decades, until the French port owners closed off access to it, claiming health and safety hazards, but in reality probably seeing potential acres (or hectares – they are French after all) of reclaimed land for lucrative development.

Railing erected to banish locals from the beach.  The locals replied by re-engineering them.

Railing erected to banish locals from the beach. The locals replied by re-engineering it.

Speaking of the French, we have been building fortifications on top of the adjacent hill for centuries, to fend off the fearsome frenchies, and the pic below shows an opening in the cliff face through which beach shingle was taken up to the fort to be turned into mass concrete during 19th century fort expansion.  You can still see a grid of square holes in the cliff where timbers were fitted to erect an access scaffold.  You might also see a big lump of mass concrete has fallen away thanks to landslip in the clays and sands overlying the chalk.

Boarded tunnel at the top of the chalk cliff, slipped concrete wall at bottom left, and a stabilising mesh stapled to the vegetated slopes top left.

Boarded tunnel at the top of the chalk cliff, slipped concrete wall at bottom left, and a stabilising mesh stapled to the vegetated slopes top left.

Newhaven still offers harbour for a small fishing fleet, and there’s a grand wet fish shop there, though I doubt their tiger prawns are local.  Other sea related activities include the export of scrap metal, and the processing of sea bed sands and gravels as part of the ‘economic recovery by  concreting the land and dredging the marine ecosystem’ programme.  Then there is the newest industry – burning household rubbish to make a little electricity.  The plant is in Newhaven even though they burn mainly Brighton rubbish because Brighton may get its act together and reduce or recycle more waste, so the port facility will allow the French owned incinerator to import French waste for burning.  After all, the equipment must return a profit, and for that it must burn waste.  And where better to burn it, and emit possible toxic gases than fair Albion?  Think Local Act Global.

Newhaven's newest industry - burning other people's waste.

Newhaven’s newest industry – burning other people’s waste.

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