Archery and Defensive Ramparts

I was waiting for a Number 2 bus way up on top of the hill near Wilson Avenue as the westering sun descended (you just don’t know how long I’ve been waiting for a chance to use that word) and threw into shadow the ramparts of Whitehawk Camp.  Two sections are visible in the photo below, but be warned, one long shadow has tell-tale lampposts along it.  That one is Manor Hill, the road running down to Whitehawk Estate, and not as old as the 5700 year old fortified hill camp most visible just beyond it.

Whitehawk Camp - a causewayed enclosure on Whitehawk Hill

Whitehawk Camp – a causewayed enclosure on Whitehawk Hill

An old Ordnance Survey map displayed in a shop in town shows the camp’s ramparts better.

1871 OS map extract showing Whitehawk Camp.  Housing, roads and racecourse have got closer since then

1871 OS map extract showing Whitehawk Camp. Housing, roads and racecourse have got closer since then

But where, I hear you ask, was the archery.  There may well be some flint arrow heads on show on a museum open day all about Whitehawk Camp and the recent excavations there this summer – Saturday the 31st January at Brighton Museum.  But the real archery was after I took the photo, for I was on my way to Longhill School for a taster session with Brighton Bowmen (their name not mine – women were present, just not acknowledged in the name).  I asked about regular archery sessions and my guide for the 90 minutes said, ‘If you’re the kind of person who likes to keep on trying and trying until you get it right, then archery is for you’.  I don’t think I’ll be going again.

This shows better archers than me.  We had targets 4 feet in diameter on the taster day - but I never missed it, but the teaplate sized gold in the centre only met my arrows 4 times in about 50 attempts.

This shows better archers than me. We had targets 4 feet in diameter on the taster day – but I never missed it, though the teaplate sized gold in the centre only met my arrows 4 times in about 50 attempts.

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