More on Emily Carr, and the rest of the day in London

At the end of the exhibition are two paintings which sort of sum up the artistic career of Emily Carr.  Both of Beacon Hill in Victoria, where she lived most of her life.  The first of 1909, and a very traditional landscape, and the second of 1937, in her much freer ‘gasoline-as-thinner’ style.

Umbellifers and shrubs with a strip of water in the distance.  Beacon Hill in a 1909 painting by Emily Carr.

Umbellifers and shrubs with a strip of water in the distance. Beacon Hill in a 1909 painting by Emily Carr.

Big bold brushstrokes of yellow broom on Beacon Hill in a 1937 painting by Emily Carr - painted on site.

Big bold brushstrokes of yellow broom on Beacon Hill in a 1937 painting by Emily Carr – painted on site.

We shall have to visit Beacon Hill in June.

At West Dulwich station we found our way with a fine fingerport sign.

Rather a delightful pointing fingerpost.  Not an official type of sign, but all the better because of it.

Rather a delightful pointing fingerpost. Not an official type of sign, but all the better because of it.

And watched a squirrel find cake in a litterbin, and settle to eat it.

Sorry about the poor quality - its dirty windows, not me, honest.

Sorry about the poor quality – its dirty windows, not me, honest.

Behind the squirrel is a three part sculpture called Walking the Dog.

Walking the Dog - a fine sculpture of a convoluted route 'grooved' into three big stones.

Walking the Dog – a fine sculpture of a convoluted route ‘grooved’ into three big stones.

After Emily Carr we returned to central London for a pint in the Chandos (Sam Smith’s Old Brewery Bitter less than £3 a pint) before spending an hour or so exploring the Grayson Perry exhibition in the first floor galleries of the National Portrait Gallery.  Delightful stuff, as seen on TV, but my favourite is still the headscarf depicting the white girl’s journey from consumer society to Islam.

In passing I spotted three Jacob Epstein bronzes – all of men.  In the past its always been female bronzes, in Hull’s Art gallery, Burton Agnes Hall and Bristol.

Shaw helped Epstein to become established as an artist, but his wife refused to have the bust in the house, so Shaw never accepted a copy of it. (1934 signed)

Shaw helped Epstein to become established as an artist, but his wife refused to have the bust in the house, so Shaw never accepted a copy of it. (1934 signed)

Back to Victoria Station by bus, and time for a last London pint in the Victoria pub, beside the station in Phipps Mews – a pint of Trumans Blindside.

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